Xin Huang

Associate Professor
Ph.D., 2003, Brown University

Contact Information
Email: xin.huang@wisc.edu
(608) 265-2744 Phone
(608) 265-5512 Fax

Postdoctoral Fellow position available (click here)

Opportunities for graduate study are available in the lab.
Interested students can apply to the following Ph.D. programs:

Neuroscience Training Program
Physiology Graduate Training Program

Students who have a Science and/or Engineering background are welcome to apply. Graduate students in the lab receive multi-disciplinary trainings in conducting research using experimental approaches and quantitative data analysis methods. For inquiry, email xin.huang@wisc.edu.

 
Research Interests
Neural basis of vision and visually guided behavior

Xin Huang

Click to enlarge Human activity is greatly enriched by vision. Relying on our versatile visual system, we are able to cruise through morning traffic, judge the trajectory of a fast approaching tennis ball and quickly return it. Vision also provides a major portion of our subjective sensory experience. We enjoy seeing the opulent sky color at dusk and admire the vibrating energy of van Gogh's Starry Night. Because of the importance of vision, visual disorders have devastating consequences. Our laboratory seeks to understand the neural mechanisms underlying visual perception and visually guided behavior.

Visual information is represented and processed by a large number of neurons distributed across dozens of brain areas. Each of these neurons is sensitive to certain features of the visual image and has a spatially-constrained "view" of the world. Moreover, because many visual neurons are broadly-tuned to stimulus features, any given visual feature is represented by the discharge of a large population of neurons. How are spatially-localized representations synthesized to form perception? How are attributes of visual stimuli decoded from distributed population activity to make perceptual decisions and to guide action? The research in our laboratory is directed at addressing these questions. We are investigating the neural mechanisms of visual motion and form processing and their interactions using combined techniques of neurophysiology, psychophysics, and computational modeling. Current research in the lab focuses on studying integration and segmentation of multiple visual features in the visual system with the long-term goal to elucidate basic principles of neural coding.

Selected Publications

  • Chuang J, Ausloos EC, Schwebach CA, Huang X. (2016). Integration of motion energy from overlapping random background noise increases perceived speed of coherently moving stimuli. Journal of Neurophysiology. 116(6):2765-2776. doi: 10.1152/jn.01068.2015.
    Abstract | PDF| Journal Highlight
     
  • Xiao JB, Huang X. (2015). Distributed and dynamic neural encoding of multiple motion directions of transparently moving stimuli in cortical area MT. Journal of Neuroscience, 35(49): 16180-198.
    Abstract | PDF
     
  • Xiao JB, Niu YQ, Wiesner S, Huang X. (2014). Normalization of neuronal responses in cortical area MT across signal strengths and motion directions. Journal of Neurophysiology. 112(6):1291-306. Epub 2014 June 3. doi:10.1152/jn.00700.2013.
    Abstract | PDF
     
  • Vokoun C, Huang X, Jackson M, and Basso M. (2014). Response normalization in the superficial layers of the superior colliculus as a possible mechanism for saccadic averaging. Journal of Neuroscience. 34(23):7976-87
    Abstract | PDF
     
  • Huang X, Lisberger SG. (2013). Circuit mechanisms revealed by spike-timing correlations in macaque area MT. Journal of Neurophysiology. 109:851-866. Epub 2012 Nov 14. doi:10.1152/jn.00775.2012. "Editor's Choice" article.
    Abstract | PDF
     
  • Gaudio JL, Huang X. (2012) Motion noise changes directional interaction between transparently moving stimuli from repulsion to attraction. PLoS One. 7(11):e48649. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0048649
    Abstract | PDF
     
  • Huang X and Lisberger SG. (2009) Noise correlations in cortical area MT and their potential impact on trial-by-trial variation in the direction and speed of smooth pursuit eye movements. Journal of Neurophysiology, 101:3012-3030
    Abstract | PDF
     
  • Click to enlarge
  • Huang X, Albright TD, and Stoner GR. (2008) Stimulus-dependency and mechanisms of surround modulation in cortical area MT. Journal of Neuroscience, 28(51):13889-906.
    Abstract | PDF
     
  • Huang X and Paradiso MA (2008) V1 response timing and surface filling-in. Journal of Neurophysiology, 100: 539-47.
    Abstract | PDF
     
  • Huang X, Levine S, and Paradiso MA. (2008) Rebounding V1 activity and a new visual aftereffect. Journal of Vision, 8(3):25, 1-10.
    Abstract | PDF
     
  • Churchland AK, Huang X, Lisberger SG (2007). Responses of neurons in the medial superior temporal visual area (MST) to apparent motion stimuli in macaque monkeys. Journal of Neurophysiology. 97: 272-282.
    Abstract | PDF
     
  • Huang X, Albright TD, and Stoner GR.(2007) Adaptive surround modulation in cortical area MT. Neuron, 53: 761-770.
    Abstract | PDF
     
  • Huang X and Paradiso MA (2005) Background changes delay information represented in macaque V1 neurons. Journal of Neurophysiology, 94: 4314-30.
    Abstract | PDF
     
  • Huang X, Blau S, and Paradiso MA(2005) Background changes delay the perceptual availability of form information. Journal of Neurophysiology, 94: 4331-43.
    Abstract | PDF
     
  • Huang X, MacEvoy SP, Paradiso MA (2002). Perception of brightness and brightness illusions in the macaque monkey. The Journal of Neuroscience. 22(21): 9618-25
    Abstract | PDF
     

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